Long before Brittany became subsumed into France, the inhabitants of this rugged Atlantic promontory were risking their lives fishing and trading on the violent seas, and struggling with the arid soil of the interior. Today this toughness continues to define the region.

 

For most visitors, the Breton coast is the dominant feature, offering white-sand beaches, towering cliffs, rock formations, and offshore islands.

The busiest areas are the Côte d’Émeraude around St-Malo; the Côte de Granit Rose in the north; the Crozon peninsula in far western Finistère; and the Morbihan coast below Vannes. 

Be sure not to leave Brittany without visiting one of its many islands – such as the Île de Bréhat, the Île de Sein, or Belle-Île – or taking in cities like Quimper or Morlaix, testimony to the riches of the medieval duchy.


The Crozon peninsula is the central feature of Finistère’s coastline. 

The main town on the peninsula, Crozon, has a nice little stone-built core that serves as the commercial hub for the surrounding communities.
Morgat, just about 1km downhill from Crozon, is located on a long crescent beach that ends in a pine slope, and a sheltered harbour full of pleasure boats on the short haul from England and Ireland.
One of the loveliest seaside towns in all Brittany, the sheltered port of Camaret nestles at the western tip of the peninsula. 



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